Tag Archive | crepes

Crepe au Ble Noir

French crepes

Crepe au Ble Noir

I read about buckwheat crepes, or galettes au sarrasin, before we went to France. I knew to search them out because they were so lovingly described by David Lebovitz in his book, My Paris Kitchen. First he explained the confusion of names: A crepe is made with white flour, but when made with buckwheat flour it is called galette au sarrasin in French (unless, of course, it is called a crepe au ble noir, or crepe of black flour). While a white-flour crepe may be served with either sweet or savory fillings, a galette au sarrasin is generally reserved for savory fare.

Although there are many corner creperies in Paris enticing diners with the smell of crepes frying in butter on a hot griddle, it was on a chilly morning at the Bastille out-door market that I was totally smitten by crepe, or more accurately, galette lust. Two young men of North African descent stood behind a long counter expertly flipping and folding crepes fried to order on giant griddles. They each had two griddles and a vat of crepe batter–one of white flour and one of the coveted ble noir– that they ladled onto the griddle, swirled to a perfect circle with a flat wooden rake, flipped onto a second griddle, and filled with various savory fillings (caramelized onions, sautéed mushrooms, grated cheese, ham, chorizo, sausage, and chopped tomato) chosen by the customer. The folded galette fried to fragrant perfection in a generous brushing of butter. Each sizzling galette was doused with black pepper and chopped chives before being wrapped in paper and delivered to an outstretched hand.

Making Crepes

Crepes and galettes are perfect street food, and they’re also perfect party food and lend themselves to ensemble cooking. Two people can work the griddles, and guests can decide which filling combinations to wrap up. The finished galette is sliced into rounds like sushi and passed around the room to sample with drinks.

Galette au Sarrasin

Crepe with Filling

Lebovitz has this advice on making crepes, or galettes: “A good crepe, or galette, should be thin and lacy. The batter is best made a few hours before you plan to use it and should have the consistency of heavy cream. As it hits the griddle, it should be thick enough to coat the bottom, but not too thick, or the galette will be rubbery. The griddle must be hot enough so that almost immediately lots of little holes will form on the surface of the galette. That’s the moment of satisfaction, when you know that you’ve got it just right, and then it’s a pleasure to just keep going.” He goes on to say that the first one or two are usually duds, until the griddle reaches just the right heat…so don’t despair. Official galette batter is made with buckwheat flour, salt, and water. Lebovitz adds eggs to make the batter more manageable for novices.

Batter ingredients for 12 galettes: 1 1/2 cups buckwheat flour, 1/2 tsp sea salt or kosher salt, 2 1/4 cups water (more if needed). Lebovitz adds 2 eggs; I sometimes add 1/2 cup sourdough starter

Put the buckwheat flour, water and salt in a bowl. Whisk well to combine, cover, and refrigerate a few hours to overnight. When ready to cook, whisk the batter and add more water if needed so that the consistency is of heavy cream–no thicker.

Heat two10-inch or larger crepe pans or skillets (I use two cast-iron griddles), if you have two cooks, over medium-high heat. Coat the pans with a small amount of melted butter or oil, using a wad of paper towel to apply it.

Pour about 1/4-cup batter onto the hot pan, rotating the pan to distribute the batter evenly. Wait for the bubbles to appear and the underside to turn golden brown–about one minute. Flip the galette and cook about 30 seconds longer. Transfer the galette to a plate (or turn it over to a second cook for filling), and continue to cook the rest of the batter to same way. Wipe more butter or oil onto the pan as needed.

After the initial cooking, a galette is folded or rolled around fillings and fried again in butter. The Paris galettes were filled rather like an envelope: filling ingredients distributed over the middle section and the two sides folded in to cover the filling. Galettes may also be rolled up around the filling, as for sushi, and flattened slightly before frying.

Add some butter to a hot skillet or griddle (medium heat) and place as many galettes as will fit in a single, uncrowded layer. Cook until the first side is crisp, then flip and cook the second side. It takes a few minutes for each side, and as Lebovitz says, it’s worth the wait. Transfer the hot galettes to a cutting board, slice into one or two-inch pieces, and serve with chopped herbs, pomegranate molasses, and harissa.

Filling suggestions:
Fresh pork or chicken sausage and roasted red peppers
Roasted winter squash with pomegranate seeds and Gorgonzola
Sautéed kale with ham and feta cheese
Caramelized onions with oven-dried tomatoes and black olives

Gallette

 

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Cooking in Italy with Gina and Jessica

Gina and Jessica are the excellent cooks at Serra Gambetta. Gina is a potter and ran her own ceramics studio in the past. Her hands are even larger than mine, and she can make anything. Jessica is originally from France, but she has adopted Italy as her home and cooks with love and generosity. I was so excited to be welcomed into their kitchen–the original kitchen of the centuries-old farmhouse where Domenico’s family has turned the produce of their farm into wonderful meals for generations. In one corner of the kitchen is an open hearth where a small fire warms the room. Traditionally, beans were cooked in vase-like ceramic pots that were set just close enough to the fire to maintain a very low simmer (making perfectly-cooked beans). Another corner is filled with a mammoth commercial gas stove, capable of turning out food for many guests.

Cooking with Gina and Jessica in Italy

The evening I helped in the kitchen, the menu included crepes filled with zucchini and fresh ricotta, fennel gratin, pasta with broccoli, a cheese plate, bread, and a salad of diced tomatoes dressed with olive oil and a sprinkling of salt and dried oregano. Gina braised the fennel while another guest hollowed out a loaf of whole wheat bread for breadcrumbs, Jessica made the zucchini filling, and I flipped crepes. This is a simple meal, totally dependent on the quality of the ingredients. The simplicity of the preparation allowed the vegetables to shine: essence of fennel, savory zucchini, tender broccoli, and bright flavorful tomatoes. A vegetable lover’s heaven.

Gina and Jessica cook like I do…a little pile of this, a big pile of that, a handful here, and a pinch there. There is no cookbook on the counter or measuring cups in sight. Measurements are approximate. Don’t hesitate to taste as you go, and make adjustments.

Zucchini Crepes with Ricotta and Parmesan

Crepe batter (enough for 12 eight-inch crepes): Lightly beat 2 large eggs. Add 1 cup milk and 1/2 tsp. salt. Gently whisk in 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour. Add one or two Tbs. water if needed to make a thin batter. Cover and let the batter rest for one hour.

Filling: Grate 4 or 5 medium-small zucchini (enough to make 4 to 5 cups). Toss with 1/2 tsp kosher salt and set aside in a colander to drain for 1/2 hour. Press gently and squeeze dry in a clean kitchen towel. Heat 2 Tbs olive oil in a large skillet. Add the zucchini, tossing well to coat it with oil. Cook over medium high heat, stirring frequently for 4 to 5 minutes. Finely chopped garlic may be added if you like. Cook the garlic 1 minute, then remove from the heat and set aside to cool. When cooled, mix with 1 cup fresh whole milk ricotta and 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan or pecorino cheese. Taste the mixture and add salt to taste.

Cook the crepes: Heat a crepe pan or other skillet with a small amount of oil or butter. Have a small bowl of oil handy to brush or wipe the pan as needed. When the pan is hot, pour in just enough batter to coat the bottom, rotating the pan as you pour to distribute the batter evenly. Cook the crepe 2 or 3 minutes, until the edge pulls away from the side of the pan and the bottom is golden brown. Flip the crepe and cook the other side about one minute. Brush or wipe the pan with oil and continue cooking the crepes, stacking them on a plate until you are finished. Add water or milk to the batter if it becomes too thick to pour easily.

Assemble the crepes: Place a crepe on a plate and place a few spoonfuls of filling in the middle. Fold two sides in, then roll the crepe into a square. Place on a buttered baking pan, seam side down. Repeat until all the crepes and filling have been used. Place the pan in a pre-heated 400 degree F oven for about 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

Note: I think you could make a delicious winter version substituting winter squash for the zucchini. I would add chopped fresh sage leaves to the mixture.

Fennel Gratin

Gina made her gratin with whole fennel bulbs cut in half. Put the fennel into a roasting pan coated with olive oil (use a sauté pan or skillet for fewer servings). Sprinkle the top of the bulbs with salt and chopped fresh parsley or dried oregano and drizzle with olive oil. Add 2/3-cup water (or enough to bring the water level to about 1/2 inch), cover the pan, and simmer about 30-35 minutes, until tender. If the liquid is not evaporated when the fennel is done, raise the heat and cook until the liquid is almost gone.

Make the breadcrumbs: For 6 servings (3 fennel bulbs), mix 3/4 cup fresh bread crumbs with 3-4 Tbs Parmesan cheese, 1 Tbs. finely chopped fresh parsley, 1 minced garlic clove, and 2 Tbs olive oil. Spread the breadcrumbs on top of the fennel and bake in the oven, heated to 400 degrees F for 8 to 10 minutes.

Variation: Slice 3 fennel bulbs about 1/2 inch thick. Arrange them in a single layer in a roasting pan or large skillet coated with olive oil. Sprinkle the slices with salt and chopped parsley or dried oregano, thinly sliced onion, and diced roasted red pepper or chopped sun-dried tomatoes. Drizzle with olive oil. Make two or three more layers until the fennel is used up. Pour 1/2 cup water into the pan, cover, and simmer 30 to 35 minutes, until the fennel is tender. Boil off any remaining liquid. Top the fennel with the breadcrumb mixture and bake in a 400 degree F oven to toast the breadcrumbs.

Roasted Onion

Whole roasted onions are wonderful partners for grilled meat, chicken, or fish. We had them plated with grilled steak and served with a green salad at Serra Gambetta. I would make this just for the wonderful onion-balsamic pan juices. Believe me.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. You will need one medium-size red onion for each serving. Peel, and cut the ends off the onions. Parboil 3 minutes, drain. Transfer the onions to an oiled baking pan just large enough for them to fit closely. Sprinkle the onions with coarse kosher or sea salt, dried oregano or chopped fresh thyme leaves, and balsamic vinegar (2 tsp per onion). Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil. Add water to the pan, 1/4 inch deep. Cover tightly with a lid or foil and bake until the onions are tender, 45 minutes. Put the onions on a serving dish and spoon the pan juices over them.

Italian Vegetable Garden